31st Seattle Improvised Music Festival

Welcome to the 31st Seattle Improvised Music Festival, taking place on Feb. 4, 5, and 6. This year’s festival takes a slightly different form. As usual, three visiting artists will join an array of local musicians; but with a couple of exceptions, the local improvisers will play multiple times during the weekend. These continued explorations throughout the weekend may expand the sonic worlds of the musicians and listeners. Additionally, there are no solo sets this year; each evening will open with a duo followed by two quartets. All fully improvised, of course.

Carol Genetti is a vocalist, composer and installation artist who currently resides in Chicago. Her work is focused on the interplay between the voice as an expressive musical instrument and its extension into the sound-making realm. She has studied a variety of techniques including Western singing, Hindustani classical voice and Bulgarian folk music. Through these studies and her own explorations, she has developed a personal yet universal palette that is an abstraction of “extended” voice sounds — breaths, overtones, and disconnected textual bits, squeaks, growls, non-verbal tones — sounds that evoke unconscious emotions and human physicality. Genetti has toured throughout the US, Canada, France and Germany and has performed concerts as an improvisational vocalist with a number of like-minded artists.

Matana Roberts is a sound experimentalist, alto saxophonist/clarinetist, composer, and improviser now based in New York City but previously from Chicago’s South Side, where she was an active member of the AACM and formed a trio, Sticks and Stones, with bassist Josh Abrams and drummer Chad Taylor, with whom she regularly performed at the Velvet Lounge. Roberts moved to New York in 2002, initially busking in subways and publishing a zine Fat Ragged, about her experiences. Roberts is the composer of Coin Coin, a multichapter musical work-in-progress exploring themes of history, memory and ancestry. The Jazz Journalists Association selected Roberts as a finalist nominee for the 2008 “Up and Coming Musician of the Year” award.

Leslie Ross resides in Maine. Previously, she was a New York City musician/bassoon builder. Twenty-five years ago she was a member of Trigger, a cello/bassoon/contrabass clarinet trio with Fred Lonberg-Holm and Paul Hoskin devoted to structured improvisation and compositional language. Since then, Leslie has developed a solo world that is beyond remarkable. Trigger returns as a system of computer processing for all parts of her bassoon. She truly looks forward to returning to her acoustic improvised roots

In addition to the Seattle musicians, Los Angeles percussionist Alan Cook plays his first Seattle gig since his recent relocation to Longview, WA. Long active in the southern California creative music community, Alan brings a dynamic and multifaceted perspective to the exploration of the percussive arts. His 40 years of diverse musical experience includes performing with Nigerian master drummer Francis Awe’s Talking Drum Ensemble, competing to top honors with the Misty Isle Pipe Band, ensembles large and small covering music in a wide range of genres, as well as extended experience in solo accompaniment for modern dance and performance art. He has performed with renowned musicians such as Dave Holland, Albert Mangelsdorf, Bobby Bradford, Fred Katz, Lee Konitz, Don Thompson, Ralph Alessi, Vinny Golia, Kei Akagi, among many others.

Tonight’s line-up:

Carol Genetti, voice + Dennis Rea, electric guitar

Matana Roberts, alto saxophone + Wilson Shook, alto saxophone + Kate Olson, soprano saxophone + Greg Campbell, drums

Leslie Ross, bassoon + Tari Nelson-Zagar, violin + John Seman, bass + Alan Cook, drums

Presented by Nonsequitur, with support of a Neighborhood & Community Arts grant from Seattle Office of Arts & Culture.

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31st Seattle Improvised Music Festival

Welcome to the 31st Seattle Improvised Music Festival, taking place on Feb. 4, 5, and 6. This year’s festival takes a slightly different form. As usual, three visiting artists will join an array of local musicians; but with a couple of exceptions, the local improvisers will play multiple times during the weekend. These continued explorations throughout the weekend may expand the sonic worlds of the musicians and listeners. Additionally, there are no solo sets this year; each evening will open with a duo followed by two quartets. All fully improvised, of course.

Carol Genetti is a vocalist, composer and installation artist who currently resides in Chicago. Her work is focused on the interplay between the voice as an expressive musical instrument and its extension into the sound-making realm. She has studied a variety of techniques including Western singing, Hindustani classical voice and Bulgarian folk music. Through these studies and her own explorations, she has developed a personal yet universal palette that is an abstraction of “extended” voice sounds — breaths, overtones, and disconnected textual bits, squeaks, growls, non-verbal tones — sounds that evoke unconscious emotions and human physicality. Genetti has toured throughout the US, Canada, France and Germany and has performed concerts as an improvisational vocalist with a number of like-minded artists.

Matana Roberts is a sound experimentalist, alto saxophonist/clarinetist, composer, and improviser now based in New York City but previously from Chicago’s South Side, where she was an active member of the AACM and formed a trio, Sticks and Stones, with bassist Josh Abrams and drummer Chad Taylor, with whom she regularly performed at the Velvet Lounge. Roberts moved to New York in 2002, initially busking in subways and publishing a zine Fat Ragged, about her experiences. Roberts is the composer of Coin Coin, a multichapter musical work-in-progress exploring themes of history, memory and ancestry. The Jazz Journalists Association selected Roberts as a finalist nominee for the 2008 “Up and Coming Musician of the Year” award.

Leslie Ross resides in Maine. Previously, she was a New York City musician/bassoon builder. Twenty-five years ago she was a member of Trigger, a cello/bassoon/contrabass clarinet trio with Fred Lonberg-Holm and Paul Hoskin devoted to structured improvisation and compositional language. Since then, Leslie has developed a solo world that is beyond remarkable. Trigger returns as a system of computer processing for all parts of her bassoon. She truly looks forward to returning to her acoustic improvised roots

In addition to the Seattle musicians, Los Angeles percussionist Alan Cook plays his first Seattle gig since his recent relocation to Longview, WA. Long active in the southern California creative music community, Alan brings a dynamic and multifaceted perspective to the exploration of the percussive arts. His 40 years of diverse musical experience includes performing with Nigerian master drummer Francis Awe’s Talking Drum Ensemble, competing to top honors with the Misty Isle Pipe Band, ensembles large and small covering music in a wide range of genres, as well as extended experience in solo accompaniment for modern dance and performance art. He has performed with renowned musicians such as Dave Holland, Albert Mangelsdorf, Bobby Bradford, Fred Katz, Lee Konitz, Don Thompson, Ralph Alessi, Vinny Golia, Kei Akagi, among many others.

Tonight’s line-up:

Leslie Ross, bassoon + Paul Hoskin, contrabass clarinet

Carol Genetti, voice + Lesli Dalaba, trumpet + Wilson Shook, alto saxophone + Alan Cook, drums

Matana Roberts, alto saxophone + Tari Nelson-Zagar, violin + Beth Yip, trombone + Jen Gilleran, drums

Presented by Nonsequitur, with support of a Neighborhood & Community Arts grant from Seattle Office of Arts & Culture.

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Nineteen Crimes + Red Fable

Jen Gilleran was invited to record with Allison Miller and Gregg Keplinger the week she arrived in Seattle from Costa Rica (before that Denver, before that NYC). It was a powerful and cinematic experience. The Racer Sessions offered her another unique introduction to a community of brilliant improvisers and composers and the band GRID was formed. With over 15 on the roster, GRID performed live to the films of Fritz Lang (Metropolis), Buster Keaton (Cops and Playhouse), Robert Enrico (An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge), Ilya Chaiken (Matchflick), Maya Deren (At Land) and many others at such notable venues as the Northwest Film Forum, Henry Art Gallery, Vermilion, Racer Cafe, The Chapel, Central Cinema, The Royal Room, and the UW Planitarium.

Nineteen Crimes is Gilleran’s latest manifestation of all the images and sounds that swirl in her head and in her garage. This will be the second installment of her trilogy at the Chapel. Joined by one of her favorite drummers, Chris Icasiano, the duo will accompany film and will be followed by the band Red Fable with Rich Hinklin (bass/guitar), Dennis Rea (guitar), and Don Berman (drums.) It promises to be a powerful evening of sound and film in this beautiful space.

Jonas Reinhardt + Panabrite + Monadh

Further Records is excited to produce our first event in conjunction with Wayward Music with a focus on live ambient and experimental electronics.

Jonas Reinhardt
*Inspired in equal measure by the throbbing urbanity of coastal cities, continental European art-rock experimentation, and improvised electronic minimalism, Reinhardt’s music transcends its influences into a wholly unique amalgam.

Panabrite
*Norm Chambers creates worlds of sound that touch on many elements and moods, from more spatially motivated ambient to aspects of cosmic synth, minimalist composition and improvisation.

Monadh
*Jake Muir voices a new generation of found sound artistry confounding ambient field recordings with experimentalist textural processing.

Medina/Walsh, Thunder Grey Pilgrim, et al

Arachnotopia presents a night of audio/visual pairings for the Wolf moon, the first full moon of 2016 calendar year.

Ecosystem, a non-linear stop-motion short, will premier by interdisciplinary visual artist Emily Stout, with accompaniment from electroacoustic duo Medina/Walsh, who will perform compositions using processed guitar and synthesizer. Multimedia artist Nick Bartoletti creates experimental sonic and video environments, using a network of old cameras, TVs, modular synthesizers, and other glitch boxes. Opening the evening will be the doom laden string trio, Thunder Grey Pilgrim and the reverb drenched psych folk of somesurprises.

Anne H. Goldberg: Music & Movement

Anne H. Goldberg blurs the definitions of music and dance as a composer, choreographer, and performer. A pianist/vocalist and co-founder of the Tempus Continuum Ensemble, Anne makes a career of premiering and performing both her own music and that of other 20th and 21st Century composers. She actively commissions, records, and premieres works for English horn, oboe, and piano solo, and has premiered numerous composers’ pieces, including the works of Georges Aperghis, Kevin Baldwin, Mike Boyd, and others. An avid improviser, she champions graphic and indeterminate music equally alongside explicit notational styles.

Goldberg is a recent recipient of the Jerome Foundation for her work that finds the cross sections of music, breath, and movement. Anne has been exploring the relationships that exist within the composer-performer, and how her work as a movement artist impacts and intersects with her life as a musician. Her artistry has been featured in venues such as Symphony Space, the National Opera Center, the Kitchen, the Cell, the Flea Theater, in Darmstadt, and others nationally and internationally. Anne graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Wellesley College with extensive course work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and received her D.M.A. candidate at the Manhattan School of Music under Dr. Reiko Füting, and M.M. of Classical Composition at MSM under Dr. Marjorie Merryman, and influences of Nils Vigeland, and Mark Stambaugh.

Anne’s program tonight is her debut solo concert in Seattle and will feature music by Vinko Globokar, Beat Furrer, Georges Aperghis, Jacob ted Velduis, Kevin Baldwin, a world premiere of her own music, and others.

LISTEN

Ray Larsen: Modern Achievements

Over the past several years, Raymond Larsen has surfaced as one of the most in-demand young trumpet players in the Pacific Northwest. This special show celebrates the long-awaited release of the first two albums in his ambitious “Modern Achievements” trilogy series on the Table & Chairs label…with a live recording of the third! (A $30-40 donation will get you both albums along with admission to the show.)

The album series borrows its name from an American encyclopedia from the year 1903 that celebrates humanity’s achievements in science and industry and marvels at the ceaseless mystery of the natural world. With unique instrumentation and diverse compositional and improvisational approaches, Raymond has created three long-form tributes to specific entries in the Modern Achievements encyclopedia:

How Glass Is Made
will be available on vinyl record and digital release, and New Studies of the Starry Skies will be available on CD and digital release.

When Mountains Blow Their Heads Off will be recorded live tonight by 14 of Seattle’s great improvising musicians. The piece premiered at the Royal Room last spring and depicts the global and local events transpiring after major volcanic eruptions: day-long sunsets, year-long winters, glowing night clouds, the legends that people tell.

Luke Bergman (bass), Cameron Sharif (keyboard), Gregg Belisle-Chi (guitar), David Balatero (cello), Abbey Blackwell (double bass), Carmen Rothwell (double bass), Jacob Zimmerman (alto sax), Eric Vanderbilt-Mathews (clarinet), Levi Gillis (tenor sax), Raymond Larsen (trumpet), Nick Rogstad (trombone), Jon Hansen (tuba), Thomas Campbell (drums), Jarred Katz (drums).

Plus a special mystery guest to open the concert!

Inverted Space: Music of Earle Brown

Inverted Space Ensemble presents a retrospective of Earle Brown’s music. The program includes a work from each decade of his musical life, beginning with his first written work and ending with his last. Pieces included on the program are Home Burial (1949), Music for Violin, Cello and Piano (1952), Novara (1962), String Quartet (1965), Centering (1973), Tracer (1985) and Special Events (1999).

This concert is funded by a grant from the Earle Brown Foundation.

Photo copyright Sabine Matthes.

Nick Demopoulos + Vance Galloway

Smomid is a project where musician Nick Demopoulos performs on a touch sensitive guitar called a Smomid™, which is an acronym for String Modeling Midi Device, and Pyramidi™, a triangular midi interface resembling a console. Both of these instruments, which he designed and built, emit light as well as sound. These instruments allow Nick to control beats, harmonies, manipulate audio samples, play melodies and program high powered LEDs to interact with his compositions. Using this instrument allows Nick to explore his interests in Algorithmic Composition, Artificial Intelligence, and Fractal Rhythms, and allow him to easily alternate among several unorthodox and microtonal tunings.

In January 2015 he released his first full length album of music created only with Smomid and Pyramidi instruments called Rhythms of Light. With his Smomid, Nick has been featured on the Discovery Science Network, Guitar World, Create Digital Music, Metal Injection and Popular Noise Magazine, among others. As a guitarist he worked with NEA Jazz master Chico Hamilton from 2008 to 2013, and has released several recordings with Exegesis, a group that mixes jazz and electronic music. In 2008 he traveled on behalf of the State Department to conduct cultural diplomacy and perform in Bahrain, Yemen, Oman, U.A.E and Kuwait. Other artists he has worked with include choreographer Camille Brown, Complexions Contemporary Ballet, George Bohannon, Jimmy Owens, Don Mckenzie, Willie Jones the 3rd, Lonnie Plaxico and Intra Faction.

Seattle electronic guitarist Vance Galloway opens.

Wind / Bad Luck + Mess

Tonight, musicians from diverse areas of the Seattle Creative Music Scene unify to present a special concert.

Opening the concert will be MESS, a collaborative performance ensemble that was founded in 2015 by Amelia Coulter (trombone, electronics, voice), Mariah Davis (dance), and Haley Freedlund (trombone/voice). Their work is inspired by queer theory, liberation politics, social situations, personal storytelling, gender & sexuality, and finding new ways of relating to themselves and others. As a group, they co-create scores as rough templates for interactive, improvisational, and durational work.

Next up is the WIND/BAD LUCK two duo quartet, playing a collaborative set of pieces by each of the four players: WIND is the duo of Oberlin immigrant Don Berman (drums) and former Bay Area resident, Tim Volpicella (guitar/electronics), who will contribute pieces involving atonal counterpoint and nocturnal sounds informed by all four players’ dreams. UW Racer Sessions/Table and Chairs recording artists BAD LUCK – Chris Icasiano, drums and Neil Welch, saxophone/electronics – will bring pieces involving both strong and free rhythmic motifs and contrasting duo voices that will morph into a unified quartet sound.